New Books at Babbidge Library on War Crimes and Nuremberg

A lot of human rights themed books have been purchased for Homer Babbidge Library in the past few months.  This entry deals with books on war crimes and Nuremberg.  Check back for lists on other topics. 

DOCUMENTS ON THE TOKYO INTERNATIONAL MILITARY TRIBUNAL: CHARTER, INDICTMENT AND JUDGMENTS, edited by Robert Cryer.  Oxford, 2008.

LAW, WAR AND CRIME: WAR CRIMES TRIALS AND THE REINVENTION OF INTERNATIONAL LAW, by Gerry J. Simpson. Cambridge, 2007.

MISSING ITALIAN NUREMBERG: CULTURAL ANMESIA AND POSTWAR POLITICS, by Michelle Battini.  Palgrave MacMillan, 2007. 

WAR CRIMES TRIBUNALS AND TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE: THE TOKYO TRIAL AND THE NUREMBERG LEGACY, by Madoka Futamura.  Routledge, 2008.

NUREMBERG LEGACY: HOW THE NAZI WAR CRIMES TRIALS CHANGED THE COURSE OF HISTORY, by Norbert Ehrenfreund.  Palgrave MacMillan, 2007.

PERSPECTIVES ON THE NUREMBERG TRIAL, edited by Guenael Mettraux.  Oxford, 2008. 

ATROCITIES ON TRIAL: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE POLITICS OF PROSECUTING WAR CRIMES, by Patricia Herberer.  University of Nebraska, 2008.

TOKYO INTERNATIONAL MILITARY TRIBUNAL: A REAPPRAISAL, by Neil Boister.  Oxford, 2008.

TOKYO WAR CRIMES TRIAL: THE PURSUIT OF JUSTICE IN THE WAKE OF WORLD WAR II, by Yuma Totani.  Harvard East Asian Series, 2008. 

CIVIL WAR AND THE RULE OF LAW: SECURITY, DEVELOPMENT, HUMAN RIGHTS, edited by Agnes Hurwitz.  Lynne Rienner, 2008.

NO EASY FIX: GLOBAL RESPONSES TO INTERNAL WARS AND CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY, by M. Patricia Marchak.  McGill/Queens University, 2008.

HUMANITARIAN OCCUPATION, by Gregory H. Fox.  Cambridge, 2008.

I’ll be posting more new book lists in the next few days. 

 

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1 Comment

Filed under human rights, New Resources

One response to “New Books at Babbidge Library on War Crimes and Nuremberg

  1. Tim Symonds

    please also post or circulate

    War Crimes –

    Retrospectives and Prospects

    ‘Identifying war crimes and the perpetrators is a key part of post-conflict resolution’

    Venue: Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

    University of London

    February 20/21 2009

    Speakers Include

    Lesley Abdela Professor David Fraser Michael Kandiah Frank McDonough Hans Pawlisch Dr David Seymour Professor David Sugarman

    Details, including the programme and the booking form will be available on the SOLON, IALS, and CCBH websites: http://www.perc.plymouth.ac.uk/solon/ http://ials.sas.ac.uk/ http://icbh.ac.uk/

    Further info on speakers see below or go to search engines, viz http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&sa=X&oi=spell&resnum=0&ct=result&cd=1&q=lesley+abdela+post+conflict&spell=1)

    Prospective themes include:

    · The implications of the use of national/international courts and tribunals and the problems of jurisdiction

    · The role of the media in portraying war crimes, and the rhetoric used

    · Legal issues, e.g. the nature of evidence in war crimes trials; questions of jurisdiction

    · Witness perspectives: protection, access to courts; financial support; are their voices heard?

    · Studies of individual cases and trials. Do prosecutions serve justice? The impact of recent trials, e.g. Milosevic and Saddam Hussein

    Proposals are invited for papers examining a range of related issues (around 350 words). Please send to Belinda Crothers at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies by 1 September 2008 email: Belinda.Crothers@sas.ac.uk.

    Lesley Abdela, specialist in Gender in post-conflict/post-natural disaster reconstruction, and Gender in Humanitarian Aid

    David Fraser, Prof of Law and Social Theory, Nottingham University

    Michael Kandiah, Director Witness Seminars Programme, Centre for Contemporary British History, Institute of Historical Research, specialising in the Cold War period
    Frank McDonough, Reader in International History, Liverpool John Moores University

    Hans Pawlisch, currently historian to the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Washington

    David Seymour, law lecturer Lancaster University, known for his work on human rights and anti-Semitism

    David Sugarman, professor of law Lancaster University, currently working on the Pinochet episode

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